• The conference At a glance

    Held from 10:00 am - 5:15 pm in Peabody Hall

    Please use the links to navigate to different sections for more details.

    10:00-11:30 am, Peabody 110

    Meet undergraduate presenters and learn about findings from research conducted on campus.

    11:30 am-12:30 pm, Peabody 210

    Come grab a few slices of FREE pizza. Mix and mingle with conference presenters, graduate students, and faculty. Or- take your lunch to go and attend a session on Qualtrics survey building in Peabody 206.

    12:30-2:20 pm, Peabody 206

    • 12:30-12:50: Student Perceptions and Attitudes Regarding Preparedness for Campus Crises
    • 12:50-1:20: Graduate Student Panel: What graduate school is REALLY like!
    • 1:20-1:40: Crafting Competitive Résumés and Curriculum Vitae
    • 1:40-2:00: Do you want a Ph.D. in clinical psychology?
    • 2:00-2:20: Getting a head start! What new psychology majors could (and should) be doing.

    12:30-1:45 pm

    Symposium A: Peabody 202

    • Rated "O" for Offensive: Using Figure Rating Scales as a Novel Measure of Weight Bias 
    • Bible Burning, Dog Fighting, and Partner Violence: Understanding the Concept of  Moral Disgust through the Use of Video Clips. 
    • No Hispanic/Black/Asians: Developing a Scale to measure Acceptance and Action towards Interracial Intimacy
    • Validation of a Brief Screening Instrument for Psychopathology in Adults

    Symposium B: Peabody 209

    • Study Abroad: An analysis of students' experiences
    • Tornado Preparedness of UM Students
    • Putting the E in Ew! Emotion dysregulation mediates the relation between disgust sensitivity and contamination fear
    • Getting Active for Multicultural Gains: Are Different Experiential Activities and Perceived Risk Related to Learning Outcomes?     

    2:00-3:15 pm

    Symposium C: Peabody 202

    • What anxiety lies beneath? Anxiety sensitivity mediates the relation between behavioral inhibition and emotion dysregulation
    • Differences in Perceived Stress Between Headache Disorders and Headache-Related Variables
    • Modeling the co-morbidity of stress-related disorders and migraine in rats
    • Relations among Fear of Pain, Psychological Flexibility, and Headache-Related Disability 

    Symposium D: Peabody 209

    • The Effect of Cooperative Gameplay on Aggression and Prosociality in Violent Video Game Play
    • Evaluation of the MATCH-ADTC protocol in a brief, group-based parent training: A pilot study
    • Friendship Through the Ages: Executive Function, Friendship Quality, and Responses to Friendship Transgressions in Childhood and Adulthood
    • Teaching Kids to Say "Ew!":  An Examination of Parent Child Disgust Transmission

    3:30-4:00 pm, Peabody 206

    The following awards will be recognized at the conference.

    • Undergraduate Taylor Medal Awards
    • Graduate Research Achievement Award
    • Best Poster Presentation Award
    • Best Symposium Presentation Award
    • Faculty Mentor of the Year Award

    4:00-5:15 pm, Peabody 206

    Dr. Murphy is a Professor and the Director of Clinical Training at the University of Memphis. He is well-known for his work on the behavioral mechanisms of addictive and health risk behaviors, specifically in young adult populations.

     

    His talk is entitled, "Novel Behavioral Economic Approaches for Measuring Substance Abuse Severity and Motivating Change." Join us for his engaging talk and help us welcome Dr. Murphy to the UM Psychology department.

  • 10:00 - 11:30, Poster presentations

    Located in Peabody 110 (computer lab in basement)

    The Effects of Sceletium tortuosum in the Chick Anxiety-Depression Model

    Emily M. Fountain, Zulfiqar Ali, Naohito Abe, & Ikhlas A. Khan

    Cognitive processing styles influence moral impression formation: Local processing is more sensitive to moral actions than global processing

    Erin D. Fowler & Elicia C. Lair

    Trauma-related thoughts and beliefs: Role moral disgust, scrupulosity and race play in emotional response

    Cayla S. Hari, Sarah M. Scott, & Danielle J. Maack

    The Effects of Cannabidiol on Morphine Conditioned Place Preference in Mice

    James R. Markos, Hannah M. Harris, Waseem Gul, Mahmoud A. ElSohly, & Kenneth J. Sufka /

    Contamination Disgust and the Potential Connection to Social Phobia

    Haneen Matalgah, Daniel J. Pineau, Sarah M. Scott, Brooklee L. Tynes, & Danielle J. Maack

    Cognitive Fusion as a Predictor of Friendship Quality and Responses to Transgressions​

    Victoria D. Robinson, Brittany M. Nielsen, Emmie R. Hebert, & Stephanie E. Miller

    Trigger Stimuli in Young Adults with Migraine and Tension-Type Headache​

    Katelyn M. Sharpe, Melanie K. Crow, Ashley N. Polk, & Todd A. Smitherman

    Won't you please, please help me? How the development of helping behavior is influenced by EF and Language

    Jaclyn K. Sparks, Tonya M. Vandenbrink, Stephanie E. Miller, & Carey B. Dowling

  • 11:30-12:30, Lunch

    Mix and Mingle Luncheon

    Peabody 210

    The department will provide free pizza and refreshments. Take the time to stop by and meet conference presenters, graduate students, and faculty in the psychology department.

    Tips and Tricks for Qualtrics

    Emmie R. Hebert, 11:30-12:15, Peabody 206

    Learn basic and advanced techniques for building qualtrics surveys.

  • 12:30-2:20, Featured talks

    Peabody 206

    12:30-12:50

    Student Perceptions and Attitudes Regarding Preparedness for Campus Crises

    Christal N. Davis & Stefan Schulenberg

     

    This study explored perceptions and attitudes toward preparedness for a campus crisis (e.g., natural and technological disasters, threat of an active shooter on campus, pandemic). Focus groups were conducted with students on various topics related to preparedness. Findings revealed complacency and lack of preparedness among students for many of the disaster types. Effective strategies that could be utilized to engage students in preparedness will be discussed.

    12:50-1:20

    Graduate Student Panel: What graduate school is REALLY like!

    Clinical Students: Emmie Hebert, Lavina Ho, Daniel Pineau

    Experimental Student: Stephen White

     

    Ask a panel of graduate students questions about what grad school is all about. For example, you might be curious about the transition from undergraduate to graduate school, how to choose and work with a mentor, managing work-life balance, the importance of funding, job market prospects, how to get started on research, and so on. No Faculty Allowed!

    1:20-1:40

    Crafting Competitive Résumés and Curriculum Vitae: Dos and Don'ts

    Dr. Elicia C. Lair

     

    Ever wondered what a curriculum vita (CV) is and how it is different from a résumé? Learn what employers and graduate school admissions are looking for, and some techniques to help market yourself to these different audiences. Tips on design elements and how to tailor your content to reflect your personal experience will be discussed.

    1:40-2:00

    Do you want a Ph.D. in clinical psychology?

    Dr. Danielle J. Maack

     

    This talk will give an overview of the clinical psychology Ph.D. and other related degrees with reasons to pursue each. The talk will also briefly address the best ways to prepare for these programs.

    2:00-2:20

    Getting a head start! What new psychology majors could (and should) be doing.

    Dr. Stephanie E. Miller

     

    Did you just declare a psychology major? Are you wondering what to do with the next couple of years in the major to make yourself a more competitive graduate school or job applicant? Starting early and getting involved in opportunities outside the classroom are essential! This session will provide an overview of opportunities ranging from involvement in research laboratories, conference presentation, psychology organizations, field experience, and more!

  • 12:30-1:45, Symposium A

    Peabody 202

    Rated "O" for Offensive: Using Figure Rating Scales as a Novel Measure of Weight Bias

    Joseph M. Magness, Stephanie E. Miller, & Karen A. Christoff

     

    Weight bias is predominately assessed using explicit measures; however, these measures cannot examine all aspects of weight bias. The present study aimed to use figure rating scales as a measure of weight bias toward obese individuals from minority populations. Results suggest figure ratings assess gender and racial differences in weight bias. Protective factors against stigma exist for some obese individuals. However, more refined assessment methods are needed.

    Bible Burning, Dog Fighting, and Partner Violence: Understanding the Concept of Moral Disgust through the Use of Video Clips

    Sarah M. Scott, Brooklee L. Tynes, Mimi S. Zhao, Daniel J. Pineau, & Danielle J. Maack

     

    Moral disgust is the most under researched domain within the area of disgust. The goal of the current study is to further explicate the relationship between moral disgust and the other domains through the use of video clips, presenting individuals with clips that encompass the varying types of disgust. Findings support that moral disgust is a unique, but comparable construct and is separable from other emotions.

    No Hispanic/Black/Asians: Developing a Scale to measure Acceptance and Action towards Interracial Intimacy

    Yash Bhambhani, Kelly G. Wilson, & Karen Kate Kellum

     

    This study constructed a scale measuring acceptance attitudes and behaviors towards interracial intimacy. A 12-item scale with three factors - sexual racism acceptability, behavior towards White partners and behavior towards partners of color - was derived. Results showed that people prefer having sex and dating White people significantly more than having sex and dating people of color.

    Validation of a Brief Screening Instrument for Psychopathology in Adults

    Adam F. Sattler & John N. Young

     

    This pilot study examines the diagnostic accuracy of a brief screening instrument designed to significantly reduce the amount time and effort required to yield accurate psychological diagnoses in applied clinical settings. Preliminary results and implications for the field of mental health will be discussed.

  • 12:30-1:45, Symposium B

    Peabody 209

    Study Abroad: An analysis of students' experiences

    Yolanda Rodriguez & Tanja Seifen

     

    Study abroad experiences are strongly promoted as transformative experiences that support personal growth and help students obtain a better understanding of their home country. The current study used both qualitative and quantitative to analyze the intercultural growth of 123 undergraduate students from a variety of study abroad programs.

    Tornado Preparedness of UM Students

    Kaitlin E. White, L. T. Stephens, Marcela C. Weber, & Mathew A. Tkachuck

     

    A survey of UM students found that, despite prior tornado experience, high perceived preparedness for tornadoes, high perceived likelihood of tornadoes, and knowledge of basic tornado facts, they engaged in few behaviors to prepare for tornadoes. This could be related to the low impact of the tornadoes they have experienced.

    Putting the E in Ew! Emotion dysregulation mediates the relation between disgust sensitivity and contamination fear

    Mimi S. Zhao, Kelly Peck, Brooklee L. Tynes, Sarah Scott, & Danielle J. Maack

     

    Emotion dysregulation may contribute to the researched association between disgust sensitivity and contamination fear. The present study examined emotion dysregulation as a mediator of the relation between disgust sensitivity and contamination fear. The mediation was significant indicating that individuals with contamination fear may have difficulties employing adequate strategies to modulate the experience of disgust.

    Getting Active for Multicultural Gains: Are Different Experiential Activities and Perceived Risk Related to Learning Outcomes?

    Shilpa Boppana, Lauren T. Stephens, Caroline M. Battle, & Laura J. Johnson

     

    This study examined the relationship between self-reported psychological risk and learning value for experiential learning activities in a sample of undergraduate students enrolled in Multicultural Psychology courses.There was a positive linear relationship between students' rating of psychological risk and their rating of learning value. Experiences involving being a racial, sexual, or religious minority were rated as the riskiest and highest-learning activities.

  • 2:00-3:15, Symposium C

    Peabody 202

    What anxiety lies beneath? Anxiety sensitivity mediates the relation between behavioral inhibition and emotion dysregulation

    Daniel J. Pineau, Sarah M. Scott, Brooklee L. Tynes, & Danielle J. Maack

     

    The present study assessed the relation between Behavioral Inhibition System, Anxiety Sensitivity, and Emotion Dysregulation. As part of a larger study, self-report measures from an undergraduate population were collected and results indicated that Behavioral Inhibition and Emotion Regulation were mediated by Anxiety Sensitivity. Implications of these findings will be discussed.

    Differences in Perceived Stress Between Headache Disorders and Headache-Related Variables

    Vanessa L. Moynahan & Todd A. Smitherman

     

    This analysis sought to assess differences in perceived stress levels between non-headache controls and individuals with episodic migraine (EM) and episodic tension-type headache (ETTH). Perceived stress level differed between EM and non-headache groups and accounted for 21% of the variance in headache-related disability among migraineurs.

    Modeling the co-morbidity of stress-related disorders and migraine in rats

    Mary K. Jourdan & Kenneth J. Sufka

     

    In this laboratory, we have developed and continue to validate a recurrent migraine model that better aligns with such clinical endpoints. The purpose of this study was to explore whether migraine combined with a stress manipulation would exacerbate respective behavioral endpoints associated with migraine and stress. These findings add another migraine model validation step and suggest the 5 NTG protocol better mirrors episodic migraine rather than chronic migraine.

    Relations among Fear of Pain, Psychological Flexibility, and Headache-Related Disability

    Anna K. Black, Joshua D. Hamer, Kelly R. Peck, & Todd A. Smitherman

     

    This study examined the direct and indirect effects of fear of pain (FOP) on disability through psychological flexibility using path-analytic approaches. Findings suggest that among primary headache sufferers, increased FOP is associated with reduced psychological flexibility, which in turn contributes to increased headache-related disability. Thus, psychological flexibility partially mediates the association between FOP and disability.

  • 2:00-3:15, Symposium D

    Peabody 209

    The Effect of Cooperative Gameplay on Aggression and Prosociality in Violent Video Game Play

    Jeremiah N. Beene & John N. Young

     

    The aim of this study was to determine what impact (if any) the context (isolated vs. social) of playing different types (violent vs. non-violent) of video games have on people's aggression and positive social behaviors. Self-report and behavioral data were collected. No affect on aggression was found, but some effect on prosociality was found.

    Evaluation of the MATCH-ADTC protocol in a brief, group-based parent training: A pilot study

    Yelena L. Johnson  & Tanja Seifen

     

    This study is the first to examine the effectiveness of a 4-week, group intervention implementing the Modular Approach for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, and Conduct Problems in a community-based adult sample. Preliminary data suggest potential improvements in child behavior and changes in parents' approach to disruptive behavior management.

    Friendship Through the Ages: Executive Function, Friendship Quality, and Responses to Friendship Transgressions in Childhood and Adulthood

    Brittany M. Nielsen & Stephanie E. Miller

     

    This study examined the relationship between executive function, friendship quality and responses to transgressions in both children and adults. For both age groups, females have higher quality friendships, cognitive flexibility was related to using positive strategies during transgressions, and inhibition predicted friendship quality but only for older adults. Conclusions from this research will be discussed.

    Teaching Kids to Say "Ew!": An Examination of Parent Child Disgust Transmission

    Brooklee L. Tynes, Tonya Vandenbrink, Stephanie Miller, John Young, Margaret E. Schneider, & Jaclyn Sparks

     

    There is evidence to suggest that disgust follows a typical developmental trajectory, although less concerning the manner in which this occurs. One such suggestion is that social modeling facilitates intergenerational transmission between parents and children. This study aims to explore the effects of contextual factors such as parent-reported disgust, anxiety, and other emotional factors on the emergence of disgust recognition and sensitivity in children.

  • Awards Ceremony

    3:30-4:00, Peabody 206

    Annual Achievement Awards

    Marcus Elvis Taylor Medal Recipients, awarded to undergraduates with outstanding academic achievement

     

    Research Achievement Awards, granted to graduate students with outstanding research productivity (sponsored by ORSP)

     

    Faculty Mentor of the Year, to recognize outstanding mentorship by a faculty member

    Conference Awards (sponsored by ORSP)

    Best Poster Presentation

     

    Best Symposium Presentation

  • Keynote Presentation, Dr. Jim Murphy

    4:00-5:15 pm, Peabody 206

    About the Speaker: Dr. Murphy is a Professor and the Director of Clinical Training in the Psychology Department at the University of Memphis. He is well-known for his work on the behavioral mechanisms of addictive and health risk behaviors, specifically in young adult populations. He has won several grants to support his work, and has published over 80 peer-reviewed articles.

    Novel Behavioral Economic Approaches for Measuring Substance Abuse Severity and Motivating Change

    Dr. Murphy’s presentation will focus on novel behavioral economic approaches to understanding risk, quantifying severity, and motivating change in substance use in high-risk young adult populations. Dr. Murphy has developed and evaluated a brief behavioral economic intervention approach that attempts to increase engagement in patterns of goal-directed substance-free activities that are associated with delayed reinforcement and will describe the treatment elements and outcomes.

  • EXTRAS

    5-minute feedback survey

    We'd appreciate your feedback about this year's conference. What could we improve? What should stay the same? The survey won't take longer than 5 minutes and will help us make next year's conference even better. Click here to participate.

    Honor Society for Psychology Majors

    Think about joining Psi Chi! If you meet the eligibility requirements, you can become a member and get more involved in the department. This is a great opportunity for undergraduates looking to pursue a graduate degree in psychology.